//

Elon Musk’s Plans To Dispose Wastewater In Texas As Concerned Locals Oppose

1 min read
Steve Jurvetson (CC BY 2.0)

Musk’s Boring Company plans to discharge almost 142,000 gallons of wastewater into the Colorado River and across an on-site spray field each day. Many of the controversial billionaire’s new neighbors have raised concerns at a packed public comment hearing Tuesday night. The Boring Company had applied for a state permit last year under an affiliate name, Gapped Bass LLC.

It was acquiring permissions to dispose from its facility in Bastrop, Texas, about 142,500 gallons of treated wastewater per day into the Colorado River. Earlier that year, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality said it had begun investigations into The Boring Company after receiving three different complaints regarding the Bastrop site’s wastewater management and concrete production.

As per Insider, several local Bastrop residents gathered at the meeting with TCEQ and The Boring Company to give public comment on the company’s wastewater disposal permit and this followed after the local citizen Chap Ambrose launched a campaign to “Keep Bastrop Boring.” Farmers are concerned about the uncertainty in the future. Some people at the hearing, however, acknowledged letting the Boring Company control its wastewater was a reasonable price for the city to host an A-list corporation.

Ambrose mentioned ahead of the public meeting that he has always considered himself a fan of Musk, but he feels The Boring Company is breaking the law. Ron Whipple, treasurer for the Bastrop County Water Control and Improvement District, stated, “Where there’s people, there’s going to be wastewater. We can’t stop progress.” The Boring Company’s permit application would allow the company to build its own wastewater treatment facility for the restrooms, break rooms, and on-site bistro at the company town Musk is building in Bastrop.

Still, most addressed Musk’s Boring Company’s actions unacceptable and pose suspicions, considering its record of brash moves and seeming disinterest in following local permitting regulations. Many are now wondering whether a small town like Bastrop has the power to ensure that multibillion-dollar corporations like the Boring Company will play by the rules.

Rahul Somvanshi

Rahul, possessing a profound background in the creative industry, illuminates the unspoken, often confronting revelations and unpleasant subjects, navigating their complexities with a discerning eye. He perpetually questions, explores, and unveils the multifaceted impacts of change and transformation in our global landscape. As an experienced filmmaker and writer, he intricately delves into the realms of sustainability, design, flora and fauna, health, science and technology, mobility, and space, ceaselessly investigating the practical applications and transformative potentials of burgeoning developments.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Latest from Blog